A designer with a notorious past, Christian Dior was also known for being in cahoots with the enemy during WWII, when he dressed Nazi wives and French collaborators in his designs. Despite this questionable choice, he still rose to prominence during the late-forties when the war was over…primarily due to his unparalleled mastery of line and shape. He gave women a desirable “flower silhouette” which always featured a nipped-in waist, a full, voluminous skirt, and a feminine, corseted bodice. Often, the hips of his suits and dresses were padded to balance the bust line and accentuate the wasp-waisted effect.


Add the cool remainder to winter with the athletic pattern, an old-school way to deal with styling that is influencing a rebound in the direct temperatures this harvest time/to winter season. The great touches like the go-speedier stripes, tennis skirt, rec center shorts, plimsolls or cowhide stockings can truly energize the look in a new, splashy sort of way. The energetic outline can give a decent fit, offering awesome body shape. Racer backs are in, however polo neck is one of real design patterns for ladies for the year.
Fashion design is generally considered to have started in the 19th century with Charles Frederick Worth who was the first designer to have his label sewn into the garments that he created. Before the former draper set up his maison couture (fashion house) in Paris, clothing design and creation was handled by largely anonymous seamstresses, and high fashion descended from that worn at royal courts. Worth's success was such that he was able to dictate to his customers what they should wear, instead of following their lead as earlier dressmakers had done. The term couturier was in fact first created in order to describe him. While all articles of clothing from any time period are studied by academics as costume design, only clothing created after 1858 is considered as fashion design.
Fashion design is customarily deemed to have started in the 19th century with Charles Frederick Worth was the first to have his decal sewn into garments. Fashion designers stab to design clothes which are serviceable as well as aesthetically pleasing. They deliberate who likes to wear a garment is. Fashion designers can vocation in a number of many ways.

In the Seventies, Halston befriended (and dressed) members of the international jet set, including Bianca Jagger, Liza Minnelli, and Liz Taylor. Dressed in his trademark black turtleneck, he could often be found partying at Studio 54 and enjoying his success with a host of celebrity friends. Licensing deals made him very wealthy, but tragedy lay in the distance…drug addiction and an AIDS diagnosis in 1988 led to his downfall. Unable to cope with the demands of his career, he was fired from his own company…Halston died of AIDS-related complications in 1990.


Although many autumn colour trends abound (as you can see from the first section of this trend report), I kept noticing the exact pairing of red and pink together too—ideal when the two hues have been en vogue for such a long time now and you're likely to have them sitting somewhere in your closet. From dusky combinations at Anne Demeulemeester through to vibrant partners at Balenciaga, there are many ways this trend can play out. Over to you, pals.
Valentino Garavani, better known as Valentino, was born in northern Italy in 1932. From childhood, he was interested in fashion, and he pursued apprenticeships and training from family and local designers. By his late teens, he was ready for Paris. His parents helped him to move there, and when he arrived, he began to study art and design in preparation for his chosen career.
When you hear ‘casual’, you probably think ‘frumpy’; and the casual fashion style could really be ANYTHING but frumpy! Women who indulge in the casual fashion style don’t grab the exotic and bold items off the shelves. They would much rather prefer a simple white tee and a pair of black pants with a coordinating and trendy purse. The entire look is very modern and uncluttered with an extra touch of subtle elegance.
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