“Luxury must be comfortable, otherwise it is not luxury.” No quote could be more appropriate from the woman who gave us the little black dress. Born August 19, 1883, in Saumur, France, Coco Chanel is famous for her timeless designs, trademark suits, and little black dresses. Chanel had a brief career as a singer before opening her first clothes shop in 1910. In the 1920s, she launched her first perfume and introduced the Chanel suit and the little black dress.
Until the 1950s, fashion clothing was predominately designed and manufactured on a made-to-measure or haute couture basis (French for high-sewing), with each garment being created for a specific client. A couture garment is made to order for an individual customer, and is usually made from high-quality, expensive fabric, sewn with extreme attention to detail and finish, often using time-consuming, hand-executed techniques. Look and fit take priority over the cost of materials and the time it takes to make.[2][3] Due to the high cost of each garment, haute couture makes little direct profit for the fashion houses, but is important for prestige and publicity.[4]
In 1966 Paco Rabanne opened his own outlet at the age of 32, where he earned international repute for his metal-linked plastic-disc dresses, sun goggles and jewelry made of plastic in primary colors. Paco Rabanne’s dresses made of small plastic tiles linked together by chains, stole the show in Paris. His first collection, titled “12 Unwearable Dresses in Contemporary Materials,” sums up his philosophy that “the only new frontier left in fashion is the finding of new materials.” Throughout his career, Rabanne experimented with everything from plastic and aluminum to fiberglass and paper to create futuristic, eccentric, yet highly influential garments.
The puffer jackets is rarely off-the-menu right now, but just as it looked set to become a slightly stagnant market the off-duty look is entering new realms as next season it becomes a viable dressed-up option. Whether it's cropped and metallic, wrapped and tonal or mid-lenth and cinched, freezing temperatures will pose no problem on nights out next winter and we already can't wait.
It was a season where emotions, personalities and uniqueness reigned supreme. The monthlong round of shows culminated in a heart-warming and outstanding Chanel show—the last ever technically created by the late creative director, Karl Lagerfeld. An alpine scene magically assembled within Paris's Grand Palais featured a lineup of Chanel girls old and new, and a finale to rival any—with the likes of Karen Elson, unable to hold back the tears, walking through the "snow" next to Cara Delevingne, Mica Argañaraz and Penelope Cruz, to name but a few high-profile faces. The show also confirmed that one of the designer's most beloved of fabrics—bouclé—was set to be a trending choice for A/W 19.
After working for Dior, Schiaparelli and Paquin, Pierre Cardin opened his fashion house in 1947. Initially designing costumes for stage productions, he launched his first women’s couture collection in 1953 and women’s ready-to-wear in 1959. Cardin’s company grew into an empire starting in the 1960s when he began licensing his name to a wide array of products outside of clothing.
When you hear ‘casual’, you probably think ‘frumpy’; and the casual fashion style could really be ANYTHING but frumpy! Women who indulge in the casual fashion style don’t grab the exotic and bold items off the shelves. They would much rather prefer a simple white tee and a pair of black pants with a coordinating and trendy purse. The entire look is very modern and uncluttered with an extra touch of subtle elegance.
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